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Posts Tagged ‘wrong and right’

I choose beef. Not that I mind multiple partners!

In Dissecting Life on August 27, 2011 at 10:45 am

Religious advertising campaigns are an open secret. Each religion gives you a book of stories and you get to choose which one you’d like to believe. Or let’s say you get to decide which one of them qualifies as non-fiction in your head. While one gives you the opportunity to go to heaven, the other guarantees your rebirth. While one let’s you take an eye for an eye, the other compels you to forgive. Yet another ensures that what goes around comes around (So, sit back and have some popcorn.). While one guarantees you multiple partners in heaven (bang on target!), the other guarantees you freedom from all desires. While one says God is around you, the other says He is inside you. While one stops you from consuming alcohol, the other stops you from eating beef and yet another stops you from eating roots. You also get to choose whether you’d like to be buried, burnt or eaten by vultures, when you say your last sayonara. If you are an atheist, you have choices too! You get to rot in hell unless of course hell lies at the centre of the earth in which case you have no choice but to get roasted, or you get to be reborn as a pig and chewed by pork eaters.

Converting? Anyone?

Believe It Or Not, I Don’t Know.

In Dissecting Life, Minds and Mindsets on June 12, 2011 at 7:06 pm

Statement: If Mr.X exists, he occupies room2.

Initial Conditions: A, B, C and Z are sitting in room1. Room1 has a door (opaque and solid) that opens into room2. The door is shut. Also, if the door is opened, nobody can see what occupies room2 unless he enters it.

Experiment:
Z enters room2. After a while, Z walks out and claims, “I met Mr.X.”
Later, Z asks the three guys, “Does Mr.X exist?”

A says, “Yes.”
B says, “No.”
C says, “I don’t know.”

Observation:
A takes the leap of “faith.” He believes Mr.X exists because he has faith in Z’s words.
B only believes what he sees. He believes Mr.X does not exist and will continue this way until he sees Mr.X himself. He has no faith in Z’s words.
C admits he doesn’t know. He is not concerned about what Z has to say.

Inference:
There are two possibilities:
Case I: Mr.X occupied room2.
Case II: Room2 was empty.

If Mr.X occupied room2, it means Mr.X exists. So, A’s belief is equal to the truth.
If Mr.X did not occupy room2, it means Mr.X does not exist. So, B’s belief is equal to the truth.
However, in both cases only one man is being true to himself and he is C because irrespective of whether Mr.X occupied the room or not, none of the three guys know the answer to the question- “Does Mr.X exist?” While A and B “believe,” C “knows” that he doesn’t know. Hence, “I don’t know” is the truth.

Conclusion:
The dead don’t know death any better than the born know birth. The most honest answer to some questions is, “I don’t know.” And all the alternate answers to those questions essentially begin with a “Maybe…”

The Complexity of Butterflies and Destinies

In Dissecting Life on March 28, 2011 at 5:01 pm

 

Our world is a complex system. In the midst of this complexity, if someone tells you that the flapping wings of the dainty butterfly in your garden is capable of setting tornados into motion (The Butterfly Effect- Chaos Theory), you’d think he needs a therapist. But if there is any truth in what he is saying, the smallest actions such as batting you eyelids can have outsized, unrelated, and unexpected consequences. The theory alerts us that the most insignificant occurrences in nature are not inconsequential. An infinitesimal action gathers momentum over a period of time to change the face of our delusionary “controlled system” of living. It makes life look like a joke; a complex version of The Truman Show.

If a butterfly can change weathers, I can prevent an epidemic by spending my evenings swatting flies. If you look at the events closely, you will notice that something as harmless as flapping a pair of wings can create a disastrous tornado while something as cruel as killing a fly can prevent large scale deaths. A seemingly insignificant event may be positive or negative (based on regular human moral standards) but that may not really have anything to do with the positivity or negativity of the situation that arises out of it.

If little things can lead to large things then probably large things can lead to much larger things, which is ultimately a collection of little things. So, can the motion of massive planets across the universe affect our insignificant existence? If the moon can cause changes in tide, it would be foolish to rule out the changes it can bring about within us. Maybe there is more to astrology than meets our eye. The birth date could be just a point of reference, an initial condition or a value to understand what moved in what direction to create what changes over what period of time. These external events could have created very basic changes such as temperature changes, mood changes, and radiations thus affecting human interactions, hormonal changes, or even perceptions to create the life pattern. This pattern can probably be graphed if life can be expressed as a combination of variables, measurements and forces. It can also be loosely labeled as “destiny”. Our story is probably a collection of external and internal events that naturally lead to actions, behaviors and reactions. But we believe that these actions, behaviors and reactions are of our own doing, will or choice. Maybe because there are so many factors affecting one little life, a prediction can never ever be accurate. But only human beings predict. Nature doesn’t have to calculate. The outcome is definite.

The movie 127 hours, highlights the outcome of an action (or actions) beautifully. At a certain point, in the movie, Aron Ralston seems to be convinced that the situation he is trapped in is an outcome of very simple, basic acts that he habitually performed. Aron says, “This rock has been waiting for me my entire life. Its entire life, ever since it was a bit of meteorite a million, billion years ago. In space. It’s been waiting, to come here. Right, right here. I’ve been moving towards it my entire life. The minute I was born, every breath that I’ve taken, every action has been leading me to this crack on the out surface.” Personally, it was heart wrenching to watch this man reach a moment of “realization” or “repentance” (depends on whether you think his actions were neutral or negative) and accept that he created the very thing he was trapped in. It was an incident waiting to happen; destined to happen ever since he was born.

Nature doesn’t say, “This is wrong!”

In Dissecting Life on February 23, 2011 at 9:55 pm

We are all great at mind games, aren’t we? We manipulate, consciously or subconsciously, to alter moves of people around us in order to get our work done. Although the Heavens would consider us unworthy of entry, nature presents a completely different picture.

This is what we saw. A bird poops. The snail feasts on the parasite infested poop. The parasite plays havoc in the digestive system, and then dances in the tentacles of the snail. Consequently, the wormlike tentacles get bitten off by the incognizant bird and the parasite gains entry into the bird’s rectum. In other words, Leucochloridium paradoxum takes over the snail’s brain and executes a perfect bird-deception plan and nobody complains or question’s the parasite’s intention or yells in desperation, “Leucochloridium paradoxum must be punished!”

Parasitic wasps have another story to narrate. They introduce their eggs into a host such as a lady bird, a mantis or a caterpillar. Once the eggs hatch, the larvae feed on the host until they grow into adults, killing the host. While the instincts are in motion, nature stands and stares.

Has anyone tried showing the wasp the “Right Path” or telling it, “Dude! This is not done!” Of course not. In nature, deception is a fair game. You deceive, you survive.

In the mean time, cuckoos hatch in a different bird’s nest. Yes, the mother cuckoo leaves her child in a stranger’s (the host) nest! The nest also contains the host’s eggs but the cuckoo’s egg always hatches first.  The host flies helter-skelter to provide the rapidly growing cuckoo with food. Not interested in sharing the feast, the now-not-so-little cuckoo throws the host’s eggs out. Baby cuckoo is pretty violent for a kid, isn’t it? Then again, who doesn’t want to enjoy monopoly?

It seems the little baby does not have the time to learn this act of violence so natural instinct is at play here. We can call it a result of genetic makeup. But does this mean that in order to eradicate destruction and violence in nature, you may have to alter the gene or destroy the creature altogether? Maybe the cuckoo just needs to see a counselor. Will a psychiatrist change the way a cuckoo behaves, I wonder? If chemicals, hormones and genes govern the human body, what could possibly be fair or unfair about human behavior?

While baby cuckoos get rid of their siblings, praying mantises eat their spouses alive during mating! “Praying” mantis? “Preying” mantis more like it!

Homosexuality in animals is not uncommon. (Turns out, there is more to nature than procreation.) With whiptail lizards reproducing without male interference, dolphins engaging in coercive sex and penguins turning to prostitution, “right” and “wrong” clearly never existed in nature.

The point I’m trying to make is this– if I step all over you in my pursuit of brilliance, don’t complain. It’s nature’s will!