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Archive for the ‘Minds and Mindsets’ Category

The Size-Zero Rat-Crap

In Minds and Mindsets on May 10, 2011 at 3:31 pm

You must’ve noticed the sudden anti- size-zero movement in the fashion circuits. The fashion industry is suddenly averse to size-zero creatures, conveniently equating it with anorexia, based on their incomplete knowledge derived from nowhere in particular. Ever since size-zero has been kicked off the ramp there has been a frenetic hunt for the perfect number.

Today’s newspaper had several minds (ranging from the imbecilic to the almost-aware) debating over the perfect size of a woman following the UK fashion industry’s declaration that 14 is a perfect size. The desi fashion experts eventually zeroed down on the number “10” with each one expressing their views on health and beauty and all of that “stuff”.

Predictably, the moment the fashion industry expressed their disapproval of size-zero women, the other sizes used it as a platform to condemn, insult, and reprimand the number. Almost as though the large masses, by virtue of their poor self-images, were waiting to slash back at all the skinny women who made them feel fat and ugly without explicitly mentioning it.“You called me fat then! Now, I shall call you skinny! Haha!” That’s weird because it was never ok to call a large woman “fat” but now it is somehow alright to call a thin woman “skinny” and frown over it.

Cat-fights aside, standardizing beauty does not propagate wellbeing among women. Then again, propagating wellbeing doesn’t seem to be the intension. Fixing size-ten as a perfect size and considering the variety of shapes and sizes that women are available in, what makes you think that maintaining the number would be any less cumbersome? What makes you think it will eradicate self esteem issues? If calling size-zero models ugly (or unhealthy) makes you feel beautiful, it is most likely that you are a sadist.

In the midst of this debate, where does the concern over health creep in? Experts are merely clinging onto another number called the Body Mass Index (BMI). An adequate BMI does not free you of health hazards and potential breakdowns. If health is really a concern, hire health experts, have strict checkups, design standard routines and generate a report that certifies that a model is healthy before she sets foot onto the ramp. These procedures are not uncommon in military, sports, and various organizations and should be made an integral part of the modeling world as well. Consequently, instead of your report rejecting the diameter of your waist (or you BMI for that matter), it will reject your habits. At the end of the day, even if you are a size-ten, the checkups will keep a tab on your diet as well as your drug abuse despite the fact that it doesn’t show on your external body. Why? Scared you’ll be caught surviving on a beer diet?

The fact remains: Beauty cannot be standardized.

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Because you are worth it! Aren’t you?

In Dissecting Life, Minds and Mindsets on February 10, 2011 at 4:53 pm

Scenario #1:  You are thrown into a group of unknown faces and asked to talk about yourself.

Limitations: None.

Challenge: Prove your worth.

Let’s see. You shake hands or drop in a “hi” or exchange smiles (warm or fake) depending on your style. You ask a series of questions about their work, their qualifications, their lifestyle and their interests. You take the opportunity to disclose your achievements, mention your university (especially if prestigious), highlight your qualifications, your hobbies, maybe talk about the family and their achievements and so on. From the information gathered you more or less figure out the pay cheque received by your opponent and you give them an idea about what you receive. Then, you switch to general topics, maybe current issues, and drop in a few jargons or argue over facts and figures (the “who knows more” discussions).  By the end of the session you impress a few while some manage to impress you. You know where you stand based on the image you’ve created in the room.

Scenario #2: You are thrown into a group of unknown faces and asked to talk about yourself.

Limitations: Do not disclose your age, your qualifications, your job description, your investments and your achievements. Do not use any jargons because that may give the opponent hints. Similarly, do not talk about interests that give hints about your lifestyle.

Challenge: Prove your worth.

Let’s see. Who are you?